Posts tagged ‘publications’

Tor Krever on the ICC

In the latest issue of New Left Review (No 85, Jan/Feb 2014) Tor Krever asks whether the ICC is protector of the weak or tool of the strong. He considers the origins and evolution of the Court, examining the context of the court’s establishment, the motives of the states that set it up and the record of its operations to date. Tracing the ICC’s geopolitical tacking through a decade of imperial warfare, he argues that the court’s selective and highly politicized interventions have operated to reproduce one-sided narratives of complex conflicts, demonizing some perpetrators while shielding, and legitimating, imperial powers: less…

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The London Review of International Law Launches

The inaugural issue of the London Review of International Law has been published by OUP.  All content is available online free, without subscription.  From the editorial introduction by Matt Craven, Catriona Drew, Stephen Humphreys, Andrew Lang, and Susan Marks: A particular focus of this journal is work that has a theoretical, historical and/or socio-legal dimension. As editors, we will also incline towards work that communicates what it has to say with a bold, distinctive voice. We want to make the London Review not only stimulating and illuminating, but also enjoyable to read. Regarding our editorial policy and indeed politics, we admit frankly and without apology that our…

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Apartheid and International Law

CAICL member John Reynolds writes with John Dugard in the latest issue of EJIL (volume 24, number 3) on Apartheid, International Law and the Occupied Palestinian Territory. Apartheid is a loaded term; saturated with history and emotion. It conjures up images and memories of discrimination, oppression, and brutality; indulgence, privilege, and pretension; racism, resistance, and, ultimately, emancipation. All of which come to us through the history of apartheid in South Africa. Although prohibited and criminalized by international law in response to the situation in southern Africa, the concept of apartheid was never given enormous attention by international lawyers. Following an…

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Krever on Ideology and ICL

The latest issue of the Leiden Journal of International Law (Volume 26 / Issue 03 / September 2013) contains an article by CAICL member Tor Krever (London School of Economics): International Criminal Law: An Ideology Critique. The article engages in an ideology critique of international criminal law texts and discourse in order to interrogate the assumptions undergirding contemporary international criminal law (ICL) scholarship. It argues that the triumphalism surrounding ICL and its adequacy to deal with conflict and violence ignores the factors and forces – including specific international legal interventions in countries’ political economies – that shape or even help establish the environment from which such…

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Schwöbel on the Comfort of ICL

Christine Schwöbel’s ‘The Comfort of International Criminal Law’ appears in the latest issue of Law and Critique (July 2013, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 169-191): This paper examines the changing relationship between the disciplines of international criminal law (ICL) and international human rights law; I particularly focus on the associations of the former with comfort and the latter with discomfort. It appears that a shift may be taking place in that ICL is being refashioned from a field enforcing human rights law to one which has assumed an entirely independent status. Indeed, ICL appears to be crowding out international human rights law. The inquiry begins…

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Third World Approaches to International Law and the Ghosts of Apartheid

The recently published The Challenge of Human Rights: Past, Present and Future (David Keane and Yvonne McDermott, eds.) contains a chapter by CAICL Research Network member John Reynolds. The chapter, titled “Third World Approaches to International Law and the Ghosts of Apartheid”, argues that the concept and practice of apartheid was central to the post-war evolution of international law. This [chapter] glances back at the recent history of international law through the looking glass of apartheid, and argues for the continuing relevance of its prohibition. The utopian rhetoric of universal rights and freedoms that we narrate into the story of…

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Nouwen publishes “Justifying Justice”

Earlier this year, Sarah Nouwen published a chapter, “Justifying Justice”, in the Cambridge Companion to International Law (James Crawford & Martti Koskenniemi, eds.).  The book is published by Cambridge University Press, as is Nouwen’s forthcoming book, Complementarity in the Line of Fire: The Catalysing Effect of the International Criminal Court in Uganda and Sudan.

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