TorLiverpool

Tor Krever on ‘Dispensing Global Justice’ at CAICL in Liverpool

Tor Krever gave the first talk in the CAICL cluster speaker series at the University of Liverpool. He outlined the main themes of his New Left Review piece ‘Dispensing Global Justice’. The article considers the origin and evolution of the International Criminal Court, examining the context of the court’s establishment, the motives of the states that set it up and the record of its operations to date. This was followed by a discussion between Tor and Rob Knox, co-director of the CAICL research cluster. The talk and discussion provoked a lively debate among the audience.

New CAICL Research Cluster at the University of Liverpool

A CAICL research cluster, co-directed by Christine Schwöbel-Patel and Rob Knox, has been established at the School of Social Justice, University of Liverpool. The research cluster organises a speaker series, seminars, film screenings and work in progress workshops. Members of the cluster are staff and PhD students at the University of Liverpool who have a research interest in aspects of critical theory and international criminal justice. The cluster organised the following events in Semester 1 of the 2014/2015 academic year: 20 November 2014, 4.30pm: Tor Krever on ‘Dispensing Global Justice’, CAICL speaker series 27 November 2014, 4.30pm : Film screening…

Sarah Nouwen publishes piece on socio-legal research in conflict in LJIL

Sarah Nouwen, Lecturer at the University of Cambridge and Fellow at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, has published an article in the Leiden Journal of International Law which reflects on the socio-legal research conducted for her CUP book ‘Complementarity in the Line of Fire: The Catalysing Effect of the International Criminal Court in Uganda and Sudan’. It is, as she states, ‘the story behind another story’. The article (27 Leiden Journal of International Law 227-260, 2014) is key reading for anyone grappling with the challenges of empirical socio-legal research in international criminal law. A link to the article can…

London Workshop on Teaching ICL

On 30-31 May, the LSE hosted a workshop dedicated to teaching ICL with a critical approach. The workshop was co-organised by Christine Schwöbel-Patel (University of Liverpool), Tor Krever (LSE), and Sara Kendall (Leiden University). It was enabled through funding of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST), as part of the COST Action headed by Wouter Werner (VU Amsterdam). The workshop was titled ‘Teaching International Criminal Law: Between Fragmentation and Constitutionalisation’. See for the workshop programme: COST_workshop_programme See for the workshop report: Report_COST_TeachingICL  

Critical Approaches to International Criminal Law. An Introduction is out!

‘Critical Approaches to International Criminal Law. An Introduction’ published!

Drawing on the critical legal tradition, the collection of international scholars gathered in this volume analyse the complicities and limitations of International Criminal Law. This area of law has recently experienced a significant surge in scholarship and public debate; individual criminal accountability is now firmly entrenched in both international law and the international consciousness as a necessary mechanism of responsibility. Critical Approaches to International Criminal Law: An Introduction shifts the debate towards that which has so far been missing from the mainstream discussion: the possible injustices, exclusions, and biases of International Criminal Law. This collection of essays is the first…

NLR

Tor Krever on the ICC

In the latest issue of New Left Review (No 85, Jan/Feb 2014) Tor Krever asks whether the ICC is protector of the weak or tool of the strong. He considers the origins and evolution of the Court, examining the context of the court’s establishment, the motives of the states that set it up and the record of its operations to date. Tracing the ICC’s geopolitical tacking through a decade of imperial warfare, he argues that the court’s selective and highly politicized interventions have operated to reproduce one-sided narratives of complex conflicts, demonizing some perpetrators while shielding, and legitimating, imperial powers: less…

Burgis-Kasthala on the Special Tribunal for Lebanon

CAICL network member Michelle Burgis-Kasthala recently published an article in the International Journal of Transitional Justice on the Special Tribunal for Lebanon. In this piece she questions the extent to which this model of International Criminal Justice will serve broader transitional justice goals within Lebanon and beyond. For more information, see http://ijtj.oxfordjournals.org/content/7/3/497.abstract

LRIL

The Sentimental Life of International Law: Celebratory Lecture

Following the recent launch of the London Review of International Law, the journal invites readers to a celebratory lecture by Gerry Simpson.  The public lecture, ‘the sentimental life of international law’, is open to all and will be followed by a drinks reception. Thursday 28 November 2013 6pm in Wolfson Theatre, Lower Ground Floor, New Academic Building, LSE drinks 7pm Eighth Floor, New Academic Building, LSE

CAICL London Workshop, October 2013

London Workshop

This week, CAICL members met for a two-day workshop in London to discuss their work on issues relating to international criminal law and future network activities.  One decision taken at the meeting was to start using this website not only for network-related announcements, but also as a forum for wider discussions.  To that end, a number of members hope to start blogging here, so look out for posts coming soon. The workshop was convened by Paul Clark and hosted by Grietje Baars at City University on 18-19 October 2013.